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Pôle emploi: Leaving unemployment, dynamic of mobility between professions

06 March 2017

Identifying professions that job seekers had before they became unemployed and identifying those to which they are oriented when they leave unemployment are valuable elements of mobility ‘s understanding and analysis in the labor market. 37% of jobseekers who find a job experienced professional mobility, in the sense that the content of the job found was different from the one performed before unemployment. This mobility depends both on their individual characteristics and on the opportunities available to them in the labor market. In a context of accelerating economic change, anticipating evolutions in the skills and associated competences is one of the main concerns of employment and training policies in order to secure career paths and meet the needs of companies.

NEWS FROM PÔLE EMPLOI:

 

Leaving unemployment, dynamic of mobility between professions

 

Identifying professions that job seekers had before they became unemployed and identifying those to which they are oriented when they leave unemployment are valuable elements of mobility ‘s understanding and analysis in the labor market. 

 

Indeed, 37% of jobseekers who find a job experienced professional mobility, in the sense that the content of the job found was different from the one performed before unemployment. This mobility depends both on their individual characteristics and on the opportunities available to them in the labor market. 

 

Three times out of ten, the change of profession took place within the same professional field; this is often the case with people with professional experience and / or a high level of education. On the other hand, seven times out of ten, the change of profession also involved a change of professional field. In this way, it is possible to distinguish certain occupational fields whose outflows to unemployment are higher than the inflows from unemployment (management and administration of enterprises, construction and public works, mechanics and metalworking), and others in the tertiary sector (services to individuals and communities, health and social-cultural-sports activities, hotels and restaurants, transport and logistics) and for which the flows are reversed: arrivals are much more important than departures.

 

 

The logic according to which these flows of departures and arrivals are carried out also has a sexual dimension. Thus, the decline of certain very feminized administrative jobs fuels the flows towards commerce, social action and services to individuals.